Equipment Considerations: Level 3

We have thus far discussed considerations for packing Level 1 and Level 2 equipment. Remember that Level 1 gear is what you carry on your person (e.g., IFAKs and Med Vests) and Level 2 gear is carried in your first-aid bag. Level 3 gear is generally considered kit stored on your vehicle or supplement packs pre-positioned on resupply platforms. For instance, you might want to store the following on your vehicle:

1) pre-made IV kits
2) hypothermia prevention kits
3) backboards, rigid litters, evacuation prep kits
4) splinting material

With regard to pre-made bundles on resupply vehicles, it is a good idea to meet with helicopter crews that are supporting you, or the QRF, and ask to have numbered pre-made bundles for which you can call. For example,specific hemorrhage control items in a bag they can kick out the door, or a whole pre-packed aid bag. The latter can be be a bad idea, because you could find yourself with extra gear you don’t need and can’t store.

In the end, you must pack for your needs and trust your skills to make due with what you have, lest you find yourself imitating a pack mule.

3 replies
  1. Cdn_Medic
    Cdn_Medic says:

    I like to keep two bags as 3rd line… One for resuply for myself and my TCCC and the other to use as a Mass Cas bag.

    The Mass Cas mostly contains Oales, Blast, Tq’s, Npa’s, and some IV’s.

    Reply
  2. starlight_cdn
    starlight_cdn says:

    A primary concern I had in vehicles was post IED. I packed the vehicle kits to treat post blast injuries as well. Burns, smoke/chemical inhalation, blast are all higher threat when vehicle mounted.

    So, my Lvl3 was packed with those threats in mind….good thing too!!!

    Reply
  3. mike
    mike says:

    As my time as a medic I’ve come realize one thing…MORE IS BETTER! Or thats what everyone else seems to think. With more and more new equipment coming out, one might say, we are overloaded with the latest and greatest materials on the market. I’ve come to learn that a well organized, balanced aid bag is better than an overloaded, 15 22ga needles here, 15 surgilube there.

    My unit currently uses the Camelbak BFM’s and its pretty good for what it’s worth, but bulky and cumbersome also. I carry two bags on mission, a dismount bag and a mascal bag. Dismount bag has enough supplies to manage 5 casualties, plus wound/pain management supplies. Mascal bag has enough supplies for 10 casualties, plus wound/ pain management.

    Anyone with a good mountain/maritime packing list please post…..

    Reply

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