Hypothermia: Is It a Valid Concern in a Hot Enviroment?

According to information published in the latest “Lessons Learned” from Iraq it is one of the most important variables concerning the survivability of casualties. Hypothermia, as our readers know, is one of the three components of the lethal triad–acidosis and coagulopathy being the other two. Even if it is hot outside, care must be taken to ensure casualties do not loose heat. Below you will find an abstract from an article that speaks to the importance of preventing hypothermia.

The impact of hypothermia on trauma care at the 31st combat support hospital.
The American Journal of Surgery, Volume 191, Issue 5, Pages 610-614
Z. Arthurs, D. Cuadrado, A. Beekley, K. Grathwohl, J. Perkins, R. Rush, J. Sebesta

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The primary objective of this study was to review the incidence of hypothermia, and its effect on surgical management, resource utilization, and survival at the 31st Combat Support Hospital (CSH). METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of all combat trauma injuries treated at the 31st CSH over a 12-month period. All trauma admissions were included. Descriptive and inferential analysis were performed using SPSS 11.0 software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). RESULTS: A cohort of 2848 patients was identified; 18% were hypothermic (temperature <36 degrees C). Hypothermia was significantly (P < .05) correlated with admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), tachycardia, hypotension, lower hematocrit, and acidosis. Hypothermic patients had a significantly higher blood product and factor VIIa requirement. Hypothermia was an independent predictor of operative management of injuries, damage control laparotomy, factor VIIa use, and overall mortality (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Combat trauma patients have a high percentage of penetrating injuries with variable evacuation times. Hypothermia was a pre-hospital physiologic marker, and independent contributor to overall mortality. Prevention of hypothermia could reduce resource utilization and improve survival in the combat setting.

1 reply
  1. starlight_cdn
    starlight_cdn says:

    Hypothermia is a quite the concern in a Hot Enviroment. I can tell you from experience, especially during CASEVAC, a number of pt arrived at a definitive care facilty in AFGHANISTAN with 2nd stage hypothermia in the middle of the afghani summer.

    During TFC AND CASEVAC, medics should plan for hypothermia. Good wound care will go a long way to fight it . Put a hat on the pt. Make sure when you put the pt on the bird that he has blankets….it is very cool in a Blackhawk with no doors at altitude.

    Reply

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